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A Catalyst For Change

The mission of the Landscape Architecture Foundation is "to support the preservation, improvement and enhancement of the environment."

By Susan Everett, Executive Director, Landscape Architecture Foundation






The Courtland Paul Scholarship was awarded to Celine Anderson, Kansas State University.
Photos courtesy of the Landscape Architecture Foundation


LAF seeks to be a catalyst for change, and an active participant and leader of a new collaborative effort to improve the American environment and envisions an American environment where:

  • A strong sense of place is evident in community development.
  • Development is integrated more sensitively into the natural environment.
  • People live and work in quality, safe and healthy environments, and participate actively in decisions that affect their physical surroundings.
  • Greater understanding and respect for natural systems lead to more holistic environmental policies and programs.

LAF's current priority programs convert the vision and mission into action.

Leadership in Landscape Scholarship Program

In its scholarship program, the Landscape Architecture Foundation partners with generous sponsors and organizations seeking to improve the environment through student support.






The Peridian International, Inc./Rae L. Price, FASLA Scholarship went to Marie Movich, University of California at Los Angeles.


The financial support resulting from these partnerships includes multiple scholarship categories, which reward superior student performance or assist those with unmet financial need and in underrepresented populations, and fellowships, which encourage original research. In addition to financial resources, LAF promotes internship opportunities, which enrich traditional education with practical experience or support research.

The 2006 LAF Leadership in Landscape Scholarship Program received 112 applications from students seeking financial aid this year, up from 85 last year and 43 in 2004. After extensive review, jurors awarded a total of $66,500 to 21 students, or 19% of this year's applicants. Awards totaled $62,500 last year and $20,500 in 2004.

Two new scholarships were established this year: the Courtland Paul Scholarship and the Peridian International, Inc./Rae L. Price, FASLA Scholarship, both of which offer $5,000 awards annually.

The Courtland Paul Scholarship was awarded to Celine Anderson (Kansas State University), and the Peridian International, Inc./Rae L. Price, FASLA Scholarship went to Marie Movich (University of California at Los Angeles).

The Dangermond Fellowship and the ASLA Council of Fellows Scholarship provided awards for the second year, after introducing their new programs last year.

The Dangermond Fellowship, which was created to encourage the innovative use of geographic information systems (GIS) as a framework for exploring integrated approaches to landscape assessment and intervention, provides up to three $10,000 fellowships, plus software and hardware.






Kristen Ford, North Carolina State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Reimagining the Land: Toward a Framework for Brownscape Assessment, Design and Redevelopment, merited a Dangermond Fellowship.


The proposal by Kristen Ford (North Carolina State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), Reimagining the Land: Toward a Framework for Brownscape Assessment, Design and Redevelopment, merited one of the two fellowships awarded. The research will address two fundamental steps in the brownfields redevelopment process: site assessment and site design. GIS will be used to develop a systematic assessment process and model creative approaches to site redevelopment.

Mary Nelson (University of Virginia) presented a proposal on Visualization of Site Specific Phytoremediation, which won the second fellowship. The project will create an interactive database of phytoremediation species that can be cross-referenced to specific geographic locations for the visualization of their spatial and temporal design.

The ASLA Council of Fellows Scholarship provided two $4,000 awards this year, an increase from one award of the same amount last year. Luke Kasitz (Temple University) and Sahoko Yui (California Polytechnic State University) are this year's recipients. The scholarship was established to aid promising students with unmet financial needs, increase the interest and participation of under-represented populations in the study of landscape architecture and enrich the profession through a more diverse population.

The Douglas Dockery Thomas Fellowship in the amount of $4,000 was awarded to Niki Carlson (University of Minnesota) for "Testing the Waters" as Reclaiming the Garden. The fellowship will be used to study Julie Bargmann's "Litmus Garden" within the park, "Testing the Waters," as a case study in the relationship between landscapes marred by economic processes and the public life of an American garden. Situated within the abandoned coal mining landscape in a rural locale, it is a precedent for future gardens as the American landscape evolves through economic pressures and ecological changes.






Mary Nelson, University of Virginia, presented a proposal on Visualization of Site Specific Phytoremediation, which won the second Dangermond Fellowship.


The EDSA Minority Scholarship of $3,500 was awarded to Jorge L. Gutierrez (California State Polytechnic University).

The Rain Bird Intelligent Use of Water Scholarship of $2,500 was awarded to Dustin Yasuo Tatsumi (California Polytechnic State University).

The CLASS Fund awarded $18,500 to ten students in California.

LAF will award the first Olmsted Scholarship next year. The scholarship will be funded through an endowment that has reached approximately $150,000 towards a target of $200,000. One scholarship of at least $7,500 will be provided during the inaugural year to fourth and fifth year undergraduate or graduate students from any country who are attending an LAAB accredited program and have made a commitment to the landscape architecture profession. LAAB accredited schools of landscape architecture will be allowed to nominate one student each for demonstrated vision and leadership.

In addition, the first Dangermond Fellows presented their work at the ESRI Annual User Conference in August and will present at the ASLA Annual Meeting in October:

  • Eric Castle, Kansas State University MLA student: Improving Public Health, Safety and Welfare: An Integration of Landscape Architecture, GIS, Geodatabases and Hydrologic Models in Design.
  • Rose Fraley, Ball State University MLA student: GIS and Healthy Living: Mapping Landscape Perception.
  • Sarah Pressler, University of Washington graduate student: Animated GIS Visualization of Ecological Flows across Seattle's Urban Terrestrial and Marine Systems.






Luke Kasitz (below), Temple University, and Sahoko Yui (above), California Polytechnic State University, are this year's recipients of the two ASLA Council of Fellows Scholarships.







These prestigious national awards support students, promote scholarship and foster a new generation of landscape leaders. Entries to the LAF Leadership in Landscape Scholarship Program have tripled during the past two years and available awards have increased from $20,500 in 2004 to an estimated $80,000 in 2007. Since its inception, the program has awarded over $485,000 to 369 students, but we recognize that this only a beginning in meeting the needs of the profession and its students. LAF continues to work on the creation and expansion of scholarships, and is currently talking with several firms and companies about creating new scholarships to meet existing and future needs.

Land and Community Design Case Study Series

The highly acclaimed Land and Community Design Case Study Series is making an impact in the environmental design and planning fields. The series, which documents innovative projects and analyzes contemporary topics, is enabling landscape architects to meet the public's demand for more livable communities by enhancing their skills and knowledge base, informing public policy, and providing material for professional and public education.

The first three case studies, published in 2003 by Island Press, include:

  • Village Homes: A Neighborhood by Design by Mark Francis
  • The Paris Lexington Road: Community Planning and Context Sensitive Highway Design by Krista Schneider
  • Urban Open Space: Designing for User Needs by Mark Francis

The Land and Community Design Case Study Series will publish the fourth book in the series this fall. The Island Press Fall/Winter 2006 catalog features Biodiversity Planning and Design: Sustainable Practices. Jack Ahern, and co-authors Elisabeth Leduc and Mary Lee York show how an interdisciplinary approach led by planners and designers with conservation biologists, restoration ecologists, and natural and social scientists can yield successful results and sustainable practices and minimize habitat loss and degradation.






The Douglas Dockery Thomas Fellowship was awarded to Niki Carlson, University of Minnesota, for "Testing the Waters" as Reclaiming the Garden.


The book features the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle; the Crosswinds Marsh wetlands Mitigation Project in Wayne County, Mich.; the Florida Statewide Greenway System; and the Fort Devens Stormwater Project in Ayer, Mass.

LAF has identified the following priority topics for future case studies: healthy communities, water quality and source protection, urban redevelopment of brownfields, green infrastructure, and open space.

Landscape Futures Initiative: Leadership in Landscape Change Symposium

Complementing the case study series, the Landscape Futures Initiative is analyzing how the landscape planning professions need to respond to global landscape change. A series of six symposia on the drivers of landscape change--urbanization, culture and technology, connectivity, economy and politics, global environmental threats, and population and social dynamics--have been held over the past four years.






The EDSA Minority Scholarship of $3,500 was awarded to Jorge L. Gutierrez, California State Polytechnic University.


The final symposium, Leadership in Landscape Change, will be held, organized and hosted by Clemson University in Charleston in 2007. It will synthesize the findings of the first six symposia and result in a publication addressing how the land design and planning professions need to evolve to provide policy leadership, vision, and inspiration in the face of rapid change.

LAF has identified healthy communities, water quality and source protection, urban redevelopment of brownfields, green infrastructure, and open space as priority topics for future case studies.

In preparation for the final symposia, the June CELA Meeting in Vancouver included a panel discussion on The Landscape Futures Initiative: Visioning Landscape Architecture in the 21st Century that was organized by Clemson University's Robert Hewitt and addressed the findings of the first six symposia.

LAF will build on the first six symposia to create a final symposium that is national in reach and connects practice leaders with other key players in development, related disciplines, and stakeholder groups, as well as the academic community.






The Rain Bird Intelligent Use of Water Scholarship of $2,500 was awarded to Dustin Yasuo Tatsumi, California Polytechnic State University.


Career Website

In addition to these programs, LAF supports career information and recruitment through its career website, which serves as resource for high school and college students, along with professionals considering a career change, to learn about the landscape architecture profession.

The www.LAprofession.org landscape architecture career website has been attracting an average of approximately 11,000 users in 2006, compared to an average of around 8,000 last year.






The Land and Community Design Case Study Series will publish the fourth book in the series this fall. The Island Press Fall/Winter 2006 catalog features Biodiversity Planning and Design: Sustainable Practices by Jack Ahern and co-authors Elisabeth Leduc and Mary Lee York.


The Russian Rendezvous

The 21st Annual LAF Benefit Dinner, the Russian Rendezvous, will be held in the Museum of Russian Art in Minneapolis on Friday, October 6 from 7:00-11:00pm just before the ASLA Annual Meeting.

The Museum of Russian Art houses the largest privately owned collection of Russian Realist paintings beyond the borders of the former Soviet Union. The collection includes Impressionist paintings, precious artifacts and jewelry from 19th and 20th century Russia. The collection is displayed in a renovated 1935 church, which is a work of art in its own right, the perfect setting for an elegant, relaxing evening among friends and colleagues.






The Museum of Russian Art, which houses the largest privately owned collection of Russian Realist paintings beyond the borders of the former Soviet Union, will be the site of the 21st Annual LAF Benefit Dinner, the Russian Rendezvous.







Sponsors to date include Landscape Forms and EDSA at the Noncomformist level ($5,000), ONA and Landscape Structures at the Modernist level ($2,500), and Landscape Technologies and Bridge Builders at the Realist level ($1,000). This brings the total to $17,000 to date, compared to budgeted sponsorship revenues of $24,000.

Please join the LAF board at this year's event and help support the vital programs described above.



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June 15, 2019, 10:35 pm PDT

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