Contacts
 






Keyword Site Search







Beetles Rescue Hemlocks




To battle the hemlock-killing insects, a team of entomologists has released one of the adelgids' natural predators, 900 Laricobius nigrinus beetles (Top) into a stand of adelgid-infested hemlocks (Bottom), as a local case study.

Toro
Rain Bird
Tru-Power
Structure Studios RH Peterson, Inc.
Fire Science Inc. OneSource Aquatics
Sport Turff John Deere
Senna Tree Hortica

Hemlock woolly adelgids (HWA) — aphidlike insects that have destroyed stands of hemlocks throughout the East Coast — were first identified in hemlocks in the central Finger Lakes in summer 2008 and then in trees in Cornell Plantations' natural areas in early spring 2009.

Researchers from Cornell, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and University of Massachusetts-Amherst released 900 Laricobius nigrinus beetles into a stand of adelgid-infested hemlocks on Cornell Plantations land near Lansing and at two other sites on Seneca Lake.

L. nigrinus beetles are native to the Pacific Northwest, where the black, 3-milllimeter-long beetle keeps HWA in check by preying on them. As HWA spread through the Northeast, the insects flourished and decimated hemlocks, since no natural predators lived in the region. HWA avoid predators by growing in the winter. But L. nigrinus beetles have synchronous life cycles with the HWA, and they feed and grow during winter.

"It's important to reassure people, the release of this beetle is not haphazard," said Mark Whitmore, a Cornell forest entomologist in the Department of Natural Resources. "People have been studying L. nigrinus for a long time and have established that it will feed only on adelgids and successfully reproduce only on a diet of HWA."


Search Site by Story Keywords



Related Stories



June 18, 2019, 8:49 am PDT

Website problems, report a bug.
Copyright © 2019 Landscape Communications Inc.
Privacy Policy