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Commercial Lighting--from Michigan to Florida

By Stephen Kelly, regional editor

Today we travel from balmy Orlando, Fla. and the Mall at Millenia, to frosty Novi, Michigan and the Novi Jaguar Dealership, two projects highlighting the work of the Landscape Architect firm Grissim Metz Andriese, Northville, Mich., working in conjunction with accomplished lighting designers.





The Mall at Millenia






The Water Garden skylight is a 60-ft. high circular ceiling supported by eight columns to which are mounted 150-watt metal halide floodlights that bathe the white ceiling in a soft blue tint. The columns also support 575-watt theatrical framing projectors that wash the floor in pattered light and highlight the faces of the columns. The skylight is also accented by surface-mounted PAR 38 metal halide fixtures mounted to the sidewalls. At center is an internally illuminated, 30-ft. tall glass fountain. The uplighting for the palms at the lower restaurants were changed from in-ground to stanchion-mounted fixtures, 100-watt metal halide, ED-17 lamps type. The uplighting in the hardscape areas are also 100-watt metal halide ED-17s.


The Mall at Millenia, just off the I-4 (exit 78) in Orlando, Fla., premiered October 18, 2002 and received a design and development award from the International Council of Shopping Centers in 2004 for new projects over 500,000 sq. ft. The unifying element of the 1.2 million sq. ft. mall is the two-level S-shaped concourses with vaulted end-to-end skylights reaching up eight stories employing custom-designed fixtures and uplit truss-work. The mall, certainly the first of its kind in the Orlando area, sets a high creative standard. Water elements, technology and great lighting make the mall an experience for shoppers--a little visual entertainment that perhaps makes it easier to spend, spend, spend. Burdine's-Macy's, Neiman Marcus and Bloomingdale's, the "name" stores, anchor the mall, with some 150 retailers in all to sell just about everything a person might need or not need.

Paul Gregory, Brett Anderson and JR Krauza, of Focus Lighting, worked with JPRA Architects to create interior lighting based on a universe-earth-time theme, featuring "water, landscape, art, graphics and variable imaging, augmented by graphics, illumination and video techniques."






The uplighting in the grass areas are 150-watt metal halide ED-17 lamps.


Grand Court

The challenge was to create a look and feel for each of the spaces, yet maintain a commonality throughout the mall's long concourses. The mall's main attraction is the Multimedia Grand Court. A circular grouping of 12, 30-foot tall "masts" with 12-foot LED video panels mounted atop each creates an eye-catching multimedia center. Each column also supports trellised canopies with graphic designs of the four seasons.

The lighting elements here are:

  • 12 LED video panels mounted to 30-ft. tall masts encircle the Grand Court. The panels can add seasonal color and display video.
  • Trellises mounted to each mast are colored metal halide flood lights aim up to the circular ceiling 55-ft. above and provide a soft illumination.
  • The perimeter of the circular ceiling is accentuated by a band of staggered fluorescent strips colored amber.
  • The center of the ceiling features a truss-supported skylight. Each truss is accented from its base by three 400-watt metal halide floodlights. On each truss are also six 750-watt theatrical framing projectors and three 575-watt moving-head projection fixtures. These fixtures project moving and static images down into the Grand Court space, providing an additional element of movement and color. The fixtures and the truss accents are co-located to minimize problems accessing these fixtures that are 60 feet up.
  • The upper walls of the Grand Court have bands of fluorescents to help accent the set-backs in the wall at each level.
  • You know how people don't know where to look when on an elevator? Well, the two glass mall elevators are lit from within by a color-changing ceiling, backlit by three colors of neon--red, blue and green. The frosted glass ceiling gives riders a playful lightshow, somewhere to look and something to comment upon.





The second major entrance to the mall, the Winter Garden, sports a 40-ft. ceiling, also uplit in blue by 150-watt metal halide floodlights. The center ceiling is painted a deep blue and highlighted with 96 fiber-optic points that shine star-like. Within this space, planted orange trees are uplit from within each planter by MR-16 adjustable accents. Within the base of each planter; a compact fluorescent flood light spills light out from underneath to set the planter apart from the floor. As in the Water Garden, theatrical fixtures pour textured light down onto the floor and the trees.


The Water Garden

The Water Garden, one of two main entrances, sports an internally illuminated 30-foot tall glass water tower that changes color while cascading water. It also periodically displays a laser show on its broad dome.

The Water Garden lighting elements:

  • The main entry space that surrounds the fountain is capped by a 60-ft. high circular ceiling supported by eight columns to which are mounted 150-watt metal halide floodlights that bathe the white ceiling in a soft blue tint. The center of the ceiling serves as a projection surface for a periodic laser show, which emanates from the top of the glass fountain.
  • The truss-supported skylights are accented by surface mounted PAR 38 metal halide fixtures mounted to the sidewalls of the space.
  • Below the skylight is a triangle shaped river, lit by 575-watt theatrical projectors, that stretches towards the color changing elevators. The river is set apart from the floor below by fluorescents hidden under the benches at the river's perimeter.
  • In addition to the ceiling uplights, the columns also support 575-watt theatrical framing projectors that wash the floor in pattered light, and highlight the faces of the columns.





The stair lighting from the lower to upper level (right) is 70-watt metal halide pulse start lamps. ED-17 lamps (enclosed fixtures) are used extensively, in the bollard lighting (50-watt metal halide), for the post-mounted building flood lights at the service courts (100-watt metal halides) and for the building's wall-mounted fixtures (also 100-watt metal halides).


Food Court

The upper level main dining area is a 20-45 ft. tall space also with skylights and trussing, accented from below by surface mounted PAR 38 metal halide fixtures. Suspended from the trussing are rings of incandescent PAR 38 adjustable accents that light down into the space. At the center of each ring hangs a single decorative glass fixture, adding some additional color into this citrus colored environment.

The sidewalls of the skylight are lit by rows of fluorescent lighting at their bases. The 10 columns, enclosed with frosted glass, are uplit from within by strips of incandescent PAR 38 fixtures. The inner surface of the column is coated with a special reflective material to bounce light back onto the frosted glass.

The center of the court, a kids' play area, is surrounded by 12 illuminated cylindrical shades lit from within by four rows of neon lights. Incandescent lamps were selected because they better render the color of the food.

Winter Garden

The other major entrance, the Winter Garden, is similar in design to the Water Garden. The 40 ft. tall ceiling is uplit in blue by 150-watt metal halide flood lights. The center ceiling is painted a deep blue spotted with 96 fiber-optic points shining star-like.

Orange trees are uplit from within each planter by MR-16 adjustable lamps. Within the base of each planter a compact fluorescent flood light spills light out from underneath to set the planter apart from the floor below.

As in the Water Garden, theatrical fixtures pour textured light down onto the floor and the trees.






Along the 1,200 ft. long serpentine walkways of the Concourse stainless steel decorative fixtures make for a contemporary feel. Each light fixture, weather-mounted on a support arm off the wall, or atop a 13-ft. stainless steel pole, incorporates a 150-watt metal halide lamp and a white painted hood that reflects the light down onto the floor. Major trusses, spaced approximately 35-ft. apart, support the glass and are uplit by six 400-watt metal halide flood lights.


Concourse

This 1,200 ft. long serpent-shaped walkway is the mall's main thoroughfare. This double level space is capped by a barrel shaped skylight along the entire length. Major trusses, spaced 35-ft. apart, support the glass and are uplit by six 400-watt metal halide flood lights--three on each side of the Concourse. Spread lenses mounted to the front of each fixture diffuse the light vertically across the entire surface of the truss.

At the base of the barrel skylight on either side are lightly colored curved panels lit from below by strips of fluorescent fixtures. The light reflected off of these panels is the main illumination for the upper Concourse. Behind the curved panels, blue-colored 175-watt metal halide floodlights wash the lowest skylight panel, which help setoff the curved panel in front from the skylight behind.

Along the walkways stainless steel decorative fixtures make for a contemporary feel. Each light fixture, weather-mounted on a support arm off the wall, or atop a 13-ft. stainless steel pole, incorporates a 150-watt metal halide lamp and a white painted hood that reflects the light down onto the floor below. On either side of the white reflector are small panels of colored glass that are backlit by the light within.

Intermediate Courts

With the Grand Court at its center, the left and right segments of the Concourse are broken up by intermediate courts that include seating areas with human height floor lamps. In contrast, hanging from the skylight above is a 76-ft. by 40-ft. stainless steel ellipse that is internally illuminated by five rows of neon.

A staircase with glass risers is underlit by metal halide floodlights recessed into the area directly below the stairs.

Theatrical framing projectors, mounted within the skylight, accent oversized floral sculptures and seating areas.

The lighting for the lower level of the court comes from recessed PAR 38 metal halide downlights. Below each downlight hangs a thick, frosted glass panel suspended by a series of nine-inch diameter rings surrounding the beam of light as it leaves the fixtures. Reflected light off the glass and the rings lights the ceiling above, while the glass shields the patron from the harsh, direct light of the PAR lamps.

End Courts

The Concourse has two end courts, each with a large dome that terminates the barrel skylight. The domes are lit by eight 575-watt moving-head projection fixtures that cast images of the moon, stars, flowers and trees onto the dome's interior surface. Three colors of neon mix to form a background for the projected images. The seating area below is highlighted by more theatrical fixtures from above, as well as additional surface mounted lamps.

Project:
The Mall at Millenia, Orlando, Fla.

Owner:
The Forbes Company and Taubman Centers, Inc.

Architect:
JPRA Architects, Farmington Hills, MI
Mr. James Ryan, AIA Chairman

Landscape Architecture:
Grissim Metz Andriese Associates, Inc., Northville, Mich.
John N. Grissim, FASLA President

Lighting Design:
Indoor: Focus Lighting Group, New York, N.Y.
Principal Designer: Paul Gregory
Project Designer: Brett Andersen
Project Manager: JR Krauza
Outdoor: TLC Engineering, Orlando, Fla., William T. Jack, PE Director

General Contractor:
Hardin Construction Co., Tampa, Fla.--Steven Rivers







Jaguar of Novi






The main entrance of the Jaguar dealership is lighted via a series of 13-inch dia. 50-watt metal halide in-grade luminaires with adjustable aiming. These fixtures (Greenlee CDB Series) were mounted around the perimeter of the rotunda illuminating the block facade between the windows. Nine cars are individually displayed on "islands" illuminated by 2 or 4-head 175- watt metal halide flood lights (LSI lighting Doral Series) mounted on 16-ft. poles custom painted "Jaguar silver." Glare shields provide specific direction for the floodlights onto the featured vehicles. These flood lights are mounted on a side arm and are fully adjustable.


Ah, frigid Novi, Michigan, where at the moment of this writing, February's end, the high will "climb" to 30 degrees--and it's snowing. Novi, population 47,386, is about 25 miles northwest from the heart of Detroit. The Landscape Architect firm, Grissim Metz Andriese, Northville, Mich., worked with the owner and the building architect, Cityscape Architects, Inc., to develop a unified design to integrate the Novi Jaguar dealership building and site to achieve a distinctive look that "translates the essential qualities of the Jaguar brand."

What does that mean? Well, I guess it means giving the dealership a style that says you're the kind of person who has an extra $65K to $72K to spend on a XJ8 or XK model. My father, rest his soul, always wanted a Jag. But he raised four kids and, well, the money was never there. I believe the last car he bought in retirement was a Toyota and that sticker price shocked him. It's no wonder, as I recall him buying a new powder blue 1967 Volkswagon for about $2,000.

Just last year while at a dealership's car auction, I saw a 1998 XJ8 Vanden Plas (the longer model with a more expensive trim package) prominently displayed. I glanced at it and thought of my father. The auction had not begun and a salesman informed me a private bid could be put on the Jag and if the sales manager liked the number, it was mine, i.e., there would be no back and forth bidding against other buyers.

That's nice, I thought, but I saw the car only had 48,000 miles on it and knew any bid I put on it would get a chuckle or an admonition to "get serious." Long story short, the bid I offered was accepted! Dad, I got your Jag. I'm sorry you are no longer with us to enjoy it.

Looking at the spiffy Novi dealership, I have a feeling such a deal would have never been possible, judging by my inquiry at a local Jag dealership of the cost of a set of lug nuts--for a single lug nut they wanted $28! A lug nut, mind you.

Many dealerships are basically floodlit asphalt parking lots with curbs presenting rows of vehicles, with a spot or two outside to promote a vehicle the dealership thinks is particularly appealing.

As Jag dealerships cater to people with advanced personal incomes, unlike us modest editor/magazine writer types, they have an air of exclusivity. So how did the landscape architects approach the Novi design for the Ford Motor Land Development Corp.? The main thought was to distill the brand values of Jags and translate those qualities into architecture and site design. Well, the first part is easy. Jags have nice curves; the V8 engines are known for their great performance; the transmissions for their smooth deliver of power; and the materials are high quality and luxurious. The design needed to reflect those qualities and reflect the brand's standing with appealing and inviting site planning and sophisticated, sculptured landscape design and civil engineering.

The role of the Landscape Architect was essential in locating the building. The 22,000 sq. ft. Novi dealership building is on a corner site situated close to the road and highly visible. The curving wall design facing the street reflects the cars' line and is an arresting backdrop to display them.

The site design extrapolates on the building's serpentine walls by instilling a sense of motion via rippling bands of concrete alternating with waves of grass along the road's edge, where are showcased only nine cars, each set atop a platform. While "No man is an island," as John Donne would have it, here, each Jag is an island.

Computer generated drawings allowed the landscape designer to project the ripples in three dimensions and to adjust the size and scale for the optimum effect of "land" and "waves." The Landscape Architect worked with Aristeo Construction to construct the ripples with custom-made steel forms and concrete with exacting workmanship.

The rotunda entrance is considered a signature to the dealership, a beacon of the Jaguar brand. The full car inventory, service facilities and customer parking are buffered by the building and rows of Hick's yew hedges, keeping the spotlight on those nine select models near the road. Garage doors, service cars and other behind the scences functions are similarly screened from public view.

The Landscape Architect also assisted with mitigation of a 3.5-acre landfill site and coordinated work to deal with two large, high-pressure gas pipelines on site, as well as securing city variances required for the project.






The landscape architect worked with Aristeo Construction to construct the ripples with custom-made steel forms and concrete, working off computer generated models.


Novi Lighting

Studio lighting highlights each display car, akin to opening a jewel box to see the sparkle and shape of a precious stone. The cars are illuminated by 2 or 4-head 175-watt metal halide flood lights mounted on 16-ft. poles custom painted "Jaguar silver." Glare shields provide specific direction for the flood lights. The flood lights are mounted on a side arm and are fully adjustable.

The curved walls along the west side of the building are illuminated within the inner curvature of the walls with 13-inch diameter, 50-watt metal halide in-grade luminaire with adjustable aiming. (Greenlee CDB Series).

The curved walls along the east side of the building were illuminated within the inner curvature of the walls using a 5x8-inch, 50-watt metal halide grade mounted flood light with adjustable aiming.

The general lighting within the parking lots uses 1, 2 or 3 head 20x14-inch 400- watt metal halides mounted on grey 30-ft. round steel poles. These fixtures are manufactured by LSI lighting.

Landscape

The broad landscaping of trees and plants include ginkgo, red jewel crabapples, Hick's yew, low-growing sumac, blue star and blue chip juniper, and day lilies.

The building and site design exudes a fluid, sophisticated flare. Certainly many people in the area have dropped by just to take a look at the design. Never underestimate the power of psychology and the subtleties of marketing. Since its opening in July 2002, Jaguar of Novi reports record sales and customer service requests.

The sales people also enjoy the new environment and feel it gives them a competitive edge.

The Grissim Metz Andriese firm believes the project demonstrates how landscape architecture can support business and marketing goals in branding and image creation.

Project:
Jaguar of Novi, Novi, Michigan

Client/Owner/Developer:
Ford Motor Land Services Corp., Dearborn, Mich.
Mr. Saad Chehab Manager, Facility Design and Construction

Architect:
Cityscape Architects, Novi, Mich.
Anthony Dellicolli, AIA

Landscape Architecture and Civil Engineering:
Grissim Metz Andriese Associates, Inc., Northville, Mich.
Randall K. Metz, ASLA Vice President

Lighting Design:
ETS Engineering, Inc., Royal Oak, Mich.
R. Scott Leo Principal

General Contractor:
Aristeo Construction Co., Livonia, MI
Joseph A. Aristeo, P.E. President



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