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Documenting Buckminster Fuller's Lost Lecture





Buckminster Fuller's work, from visionary architectural creations and experimental structures to expressive drawings and poetic musings, has been cited as foreshadowing today's green design and prefab housing movements.


A new book about the inventor of the geodesic dome, titled, R. Buckminster Fuller: World Man (Princeton Architectural Press, Dec. 2013, $21.95), details his never-before-published 1966 Kassler lecture at the Princeton University School of Architecture.

Delivered at the height of his career, he used the lecture to reflect on and synthesize significant concepts. In addition to a faithful facsimile of the lectures typewritten transcript, the book includes an introductory essay on Fuller's work, a glossary of key terms and phrases, and an interview with Robert Geddes, the dean responsible for bringing Fuller to teach and lecture at the school.

Fuller (1895-1983) is considered by many to be one of the most innovative and influential thinkers of the 20th century. Fuller sought out long-term, technology-led solutions to the world's most pressing social and environmental problems.

The book was edited by Daniel Lopez-Perez, an assistant professor in architecture and a Ph.D. candidate of history and theory in the department of architecture at Princeton University. In professional practice, Lopez-Perez has been project architect in a number of large scale commissions and international competitions for David Chipperfield Architects in London. In New York, Lopez-Perez was project architect for Foreign Office Architects, developing the design of The Bundle Tower and within the United Architects Team, for the Lower Manhattan Development Corporation's World Trade Center Ideas Competition. Currently, Lopez-Perez is building a number of residential projects along the coast of Baja California.








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November 22, 2019, 12:12 pm PDT

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