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Education Critical for Landscape Architects




Diane Menzies, International Federation of Landscape Architects president, says "Although there are 30,000 landscape architects practicing in America the universities can't train enough graduates to satisfy demand, which is growing at 20 percent a year."
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"Education is the most important issue for landscape architects," International Federation of Landscape Architects president Diane Menzies said today. "Education is needed in Africa, America, Asia...throughout the globe. Although there are 30,000 landscape architects practicing in America the universities can't train enough graduates to satisfy demand, which is growing at 20 percent a year,'' Dr Menzies said from Washington DC.

That means the US alone will need 6000 more landscape architects this year to respond to increasingly complex environmental issues. Rapid development in China, Russia, India and the Middle East has developers clamoring for landscape planners, designers and managers.

Dr Menzies has been in Washington DC to visit the World Bank, the National Parks Service and is to return to the US to give a presentation to Harvard University on global issues.

"We need well trained landscape architects to respond to urban security and disaster response,'' Diane Menzies said. "Our planet now, as never before, faces global environmental issues. We have moved beyond doubt and denial to recognize the inconvenient truth of climate change. It is happening around us and is affecting weather patterns, crop production, island nations, cities and species survival.

"Some of the world's cataclysmic disasters are associated with climate change such as floods and massive landslides. Our Landscape Architecture Month will help increase global understanding and support. As our world's population continues to expand the stress placed on scarce resources, particularly clean water, will become even more critical. Global sustainability is at risk," Dr Menzies said. "Seas are becoming increasingly polluted from uncontrolled discharges and silt washed from the land, damaging corals, fish and bird life."

IFLA will discuss global disasters and how to resolve them at the next World Congress meeting in Kuala Lumpur on August 27-31.


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December 8, 2019, 7:44 am PDT

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