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Studio Bryan Hanes
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Studio Bryan Hanes, located in Philadelphia, creates socially and ecologically sustainable spaces where natural and cultural systems are shown deference by design. The studio is modeled on an interactive academic design process that emphasizes exploration, experimentation and meaningful collaboration. Since 2008, Studio Bryan Hanes has developed a portfolio of communal spaces, parks, and museums that express practicality and yield places with social purpose and integrity. The studio offers landscape architectural services including master planning, design, construction oversight, and stakeholder and community engagement. Founding principal Bryan Hanes and four design staff comprise the studio.



Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

University of Delaware Academy Street Dining and Residence Hall, Newark, Del.
The Academy Street Dining and Residence (now Cesar Rodney Dining Hall) site is a critical element within the University of Delaware campus, linking East Campus to Central Campus and the Historic Green's formal structure. The challenge was to fluidly incorporate a large dining hall serving new residential buildings into the historic and formal landscape. The design team's solution was to extend the landscape over the dining hall and tie in residential units from the rooftop Green. The design integrates sustainability and preservation, as the Green extends over the roof of the dining hall and cascades down to Academy Street, both masking the dining hall's large volume and lending unique elements to the rapidly growing University of Delaware campus.




Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Pier 68, Philadelphia, Pa.
Three and a half miles south of Penn Treaty Park along the Delaware River Trail, Pier 68 is a key feature of the waterfront's park and path system. The stretch of the Delaware River that skirts Philadelphia has long been channelized, due to its past and on-going industrial functions, resulting in a hard, urban edge. Access to the waterfront is largely discouraged and, in most cases, is nonexistent; the few transformed piers that punctuate the river's edge are rare exceptions. Located at the trailhead and atop a former industrial site, the design of Pier 68 is resourceful in its approach to limited space and budget. A cut in the center of the pier, planted with riparian vegetation, reveals the tidal fluctuations of the Delaware River. Bold blue and white striped 'mustache' benches provide views of river traffic and the twin skylines of Philadelphia and Camden. The resultant park is a dynamic place for riverside recreation - a rare commodity in Philadelphia.




Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Sister Cities Garden at Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa.
The redesign of Philadelphia's Sister Cities garden builds on the successes of the recent renovations at Logan Square, one of the original squares of William Penn. It breathes fresh life and activity into a nearly forgotten corner of this great space. Boasting a cafe, a water feature that celebrates the Sister Cities, lush gardens and a children's garden, the new park draws visitors at different times of day, creating a vibrant space that can accommodate multiple activities.




Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Studio Bryan Hanes

Reading Viaduct Rail Park: SEPTA Spur, Philadelphia, Pa.
Studio Bryan Hanes developed a design for the Reading Viaduct Spur, a quarter-mile arm of the viaduct that stretches between Philadelphia's Broad Street and Callowhill Street based on the priorities identified by stakeholders early in the process: the desire to maintain material authenticity, local integrity, and visual simplicity. Beginning at grade, the space, approximately 30 feet wide, rises until it becomes entirely supported by structure. Much of the material character of the design comes from the existing structure of the elevated rail line: the existing steel is largely maintained and the platforms, benches and guardrails use materials of a similar industrial scale and character. The vegetation, too, conveys the rugged character of the place through a richly varied plant palette. The vegetation on grade is comprised of woody shrubs and trees. As it transitions to structure, the vegetation becomes less dense and features a lighter palette of grasses and perennials.




As seen in LASN magazine, October 2018.



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April 22, 2019, 5:46 pm PDT

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