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Stuart Collection, UCSD Alexis Smith's "Snake Path" at the University of California, San Diego, is a site-related sculpture, the eleventh project in the internationally recognized Stuart Collection. The immediate focus of the work is the 560-foot-long, slightly crowned slate snake-shaped pathway whose tail loops around the sidewalk at the base of the UCSD Engineering Mall and from there ascends a 1:6 slope to the university library.

Alongside the path is a seven-foot-high granite replica of Milton's Paradise Lost (not shown). "Smith's sculpture sets up a metaphor for the 'University as a Paradise' from which students must eventually move on into the real world, . . . with knowledge . . . as a guide," explains Mary Livingstone Beebe, Director of the Stuart Collection. The hexagonal paving shifts to mosaic pattern for the snake's head (see opposite lower right) Photo credit: Philipp Scholz Ritterman

The Winged Victory Garden OPI International commissioned a duplicate of "The Nike of Samothrace" (circa 200 B.C.) for the Pasadena Showcase House of Design, 1994. Thematically based on the romanticized Homeric epic, "The Odyssey," the garden "narrative" depicts Ulysses' Journey to Ithaka. The focal sculpture, known as "The Winged Victory," stands on a three-part pedestal of Italian sandstone, carved to the exacting specifications of the columns at the Parthenon in Greece. The victory statue is encompassed by a wooden representation of a ship's prow, recalling its original placement in a boat on shore, to commemorate heroic battles. The plant palette reflects varieties found in ancient Greece and Italy. Photo: copyright 1994, Alexander Vertikoff

Robert Allerton Park Owned and operated by the University of Illinois since 1946, Robert Allerton Park & Conference Center provides an unique opportunity for the public to experience the grandeur of an early 20th-century American Country Place. Originally known as "The Farms," Allerton's estate garden displays samples of many tastes and cultures on an impressive scale, from antique ornament to limited edition artists' bronzes. Poised at the highest crest in the formal gardens stands a stone copy of Auguste Rodin's "Adam (The Creation of Man),"(left) casting changing shadows like a giant sundial (Allerton donated the bronze original to the Chicago Art Institute in 1921). At the end of a road which winds through woods to a windswept clearing, the bronze casting of Swedish sculptor Carl Milles' "Sunsinger" (circa 1930, above) celebrates the rising sun against the prairie horizon. Photos: The University of Illinois

Simon Wiesenthal Center To create a focus for gatherings and meditation, Melendrez Associates designed a gently sloped outdoor plaza and garden dedicated to the memory of Holocaust victims at the Simon Wiesenthal Museum of Tolerance Memorial Garden in Los Angeles, California. A contemplative view from a central plaza toward the sculptural Walk of Remembrance (a special memorial to all non-Jews who were victims) reveals jagged boulders representing the trials of life, from which spring rivers of tears, flowing down the wall and across the path.

"Soaring Dreams" The creations of artist Dennis Smith depict the simple joys of life with figures of children whose gleeful gestures celebrate the moment. "Soaring Dreams" (above) was commissioned for the city of Santa Fe Springs, California, in commemoration of the young people of their community. Placed in a fountain, a series of five cast bronze, life-size sculptures seem to float above fabricated bronze pedestals, nine to eighteen feet high.

Edward Roybal Federal Center While the Landscape Architect of Record created the softscape and plant palette for the Edward Roybal Federal Center in Los Angeles (the site of the famous Rodney King hearings), Richard Thomas (now of TGP, Inc. in Encino, California, then with SWA Group) designed the hardscape elements - including trellis, stairs, seat walls, paving, and a dry fountain - that provide the setting for public art. Tom Otterness' "The New World," the central sculpture of a female holding a sphere representing the world (not shown) and trellis frieze of male and female forms (below and throughout) that carry spheres, scrolls, and books up columns and along a trellis to the court building in the Upper Plaza where justice is served. In the Lower Plaza, "Molecular Man" by Jonathan Borofsky (opposite, top right) conveys another struggle for justice.

The Bradley Family Foundation Sculpture Garden The landscape architectural firm Langford and Moreau of Chicago developed the botanical garden on the 40-acre Milwaukee, Wisconsin farmland purchased by Harry Bradley in 1928. It was not until 1962 that Mr. and Mrs. Bradley, art patrons since the 50's, placed the first of 61 sculptures in the garden. Mrs. Bradley reviewed models of sculptures to see how each piece would blend with adjacent art and land forms before new sculptures were permanently secured. Pictured is George Sugarman's painted yellow aluminum "Trio." Large circular rings of diminishing sizes are attached at various edges and appear concentric from this vantage point.

Nebraska Bicentennial Sculpture Project What has been called Nebraska's "500-Mile Museum Without Walls" features modern sculptures commissioned through a design contest for placement in safety rest areas along I-80. The project was conceived as part of the American Revolution Bicentennial Celebration with an artist-in-residency program that would contribute to the state's cultural heritage. The abstract pieces, like Hans Van de Bovenkamp's 35-foot-tall aluminum "Roadway Confluence" which celebrates Nebraska's historic role in transcontinental transportation

(right), were dedicated July 4, 1976. The dedication ceremony moved from sculpture to sculpture in an east-to-west progression beginning at midday and ending after 7-1/2 hours. Photo: Dan Ladely, supplied by Nebraska DOT

Lake Elsinore Storm Stadium At the home of the California minor league baseball team Lake Elsinore Storm, Coburn Topiary provided welded topiary structures of a pitcher (above) and batter (not shown) to anchor each end of a promenade. At 1-1/2 times life size, the sculptures are so intricately detailed that planting was omitted altogether. EPT Landscape Architecture's theme design is completed with 30"-diameter, custom pre-cast baseball sculptures (not shown) that ring the entrance plaza and perform a dual service as bollards and casual seating, contributing to the "fun" of attending a ballgame.

Harmony Wind Harps By bringing earth, wind, and sky together with resonant harmonies, acoustic sculptures add the unifying dimension of sound to landscape design. Based on principles of science, art, and music, wind harps resonate to different harmonic chords like musical instruments. The strings and soundbox of this prototype wind harp by Ross Barrable are stainless steel, and the neck and pedestal are reinforced concrete. Other pieces are non-traditional forms of bronze, gold, silver, and titanium with nylon strings, affecting the sound produced. Many wind harps have the potential to create a sound garden.

Nebraska Bicentennial Sculpture Project What has been called Nebraska's "500-Mile Museum Without Walls" features modern sculptures commissioned through a design contest for placement in safety rest areas along I-80. The project was conceived as part of the American Revolution Bicentennial Celebration with an artist-in-residency program that would contribute to the state's cultural heritage. The abstract pieces, like Hans Van de Bovenkamp's 35-foot-tall aluminum "Roadway Confluence" which celebrates Nebraska's historic role in transcontinental transportation

(right), were dedicated July 4, 1976. The dedication ceremony moved from sculpture to sculpture in an east-to-west progression beginning at midday and ending after 7-1/2 hours. Photo: Dan Ladely, supplied by Nebraska DOT

right: Cantalini's Landscape and Maintenance crew kept their distance from Jim Gary's "dinosaurs" when the sculptures found a temporary home at Black Hawk Plaza Water Feature in Danville, California as part of a joint promotion for the opening of UC Berkeley Museum. The creatures are made entirely from recycled auto parts.

Resources

The sculpture gardens described in "LASN Sculpture Garden" illustrate many possibilities for integrating the artistic strengths of Landscape Architect and Sculptor. Selecting the right sculptor or piece for the environment may require a lengthy process of getting acquainted with sculptors and their artistry -- frequenting public and commercial galleries, meeting with sculptors individually or, particularly where public art funds are involved, conducting design contests.

For those who have not yet gained a wide acquaintance among sculptors, options exist. While museum pieces are likely to be in permanent collections, sculpture galleries and parks provide opportunities to view pieces that are available for loan or lease as well as purchase. For instance, Sheila Thau, owner of Quietude Sculpture Gallery in East Brunswick, New Jersey, not only has pieces available in the gallery, but "will work with architects and designers to create site-specific works."

left (B/W): With Sy Rosenwasser's bronze casting of "The Family," Concordia University's Benjamin Marxhausen initiated an innovative "sculpture preview program" that gives regional artists an attractive setting to showcase large-scale works in Irvine, California.


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