Contacts
 




Keyword Site Search








Vermont Becomes 50th State to License Landscape Architects




According to the new law (Senate Bill #28), beginning July 1, 2010, all landscape architects who practice in the state must hold a license issued by the Vermont Secretary of State's Office of Professional Regulation. The process for licensure is currently being developed.


The State of Vermont has passed a new law that requires landscape architects to be licensed, making it the last state in the union to regulate the profession. The Vermont Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) worked with the legislature over the last eight years to encourage licensing requirements.

John Deere
Cost of Wisconsin
TLE
Ferris Industries Playworld
Teak Warehouse Valmont
BCI Burke Company The Cedar Store
Belgard

"We're absolutely thrilled that Vermont has joined the rest of the nation in acknowledging the importance of the specific skills and education of our profession," says Kathleen Ryan, Vermont ASLA President. "Our work affects the health, safety, and welfare of Vermont's people and environment, so we think it's important to protect that by making sure that anyone identified as a 'landscape architect' is properly qualified."

According to the new law (Senate Bill #28), beginning July 1, 2010, all landscape architects who practice in the state must hold a license issued by the Vermont Secretary of State's Office of Professional Regulation. The process for licensure is currently being developed.

Landscape architects who have been working in Vermont for at least nine years and are not licensed in other states will have the opportunity to be "grandfathered" in and will not be required to take an exam to obtain their licenses. Landscape architects with licenses in other states will be able to obtain a Vermont license through reciprocity. New landscape architects will also be able to gain licensure by taking the Landscape Architecture Registration Exam, the same exam used in the other 49 states.

California was the first state to enact landscape architecture regulations in 1953 citing the profession's potential impact on the public health, safety, and welfare. By 2007, Vermont was the only state left without such requirements. The Vermont legislature plans to review the act in 2013 to determine whether the new rules have benefited public welfare.

Founded in 1998, the Vermont Chapter of the ASLA is the professional association for landscape architects, representing more than 60 members within Vermont. The fastest-growing design profession, landscape architecture is a comprehensive discipline of land analysis, planning, design, management, preservation, and rehabilitation. ASLA promotes the landscape architecture profession and advances the practice through advocacy, education, communication, and fellowship.

hello

Related Stories



September 18, 2019, 4:05 pm PDT

Website problems, report a bug.
Copyright © 2019 Landscape Communications Inc.
Privacy Policy